What is life like for GPs in New Zealand?

What is it like to work as a Doctor in New Zealand

Before you start your GP job search in New Zealand, you may want to find out more about day to day life in New Zealand.

There are just 4.8 million New Zealanders, scattered across 270,534 sq km: bigger than the UK with one-fourteenth the population. New Zealand is the land of extremes with sublime forests, mountains, lakes, beaches and glaziers. It is relatively easy to travel around with distances between different towns and cities not being too great. Transport networks are well developed with airports throughout the country and well maintained highways.

It is made up of two main islands and numerous smaller ones: the North Island (known as Te Ika-a-Maui in Maori) is the more populous of the two, and is separated by the Cook Strait from the somewhat larger but much less populated South Island (or Te Waipounamu).

New Zealand is consistently rated as a country with one of the highest qualities of life in the world. It offers a safe environment for the whole family offering a great outdoor lifestyle.  New Zealand is an increasing multicultural society that appeals due to its diversity, laid back way of life and temperate climate.

New Zealand People

This former British colony has a population mainly of European descent but with an important indigenous Māori minority of mixed blood, a rapidly growing Asian minority, and smaller minorities of Polynesians, people from the Americas, South Africans and African.

The people of New Zealand are famed for their relaxed and friendly approach. More than one million New Zealanders were born overseas.

New Zealand Climate

New Zealand has mild temperatures, moderate rainfall and many hours of sunshine.
While the far north has subtropical weather during summer, and inland alpine areas of the South Island can get as cold as -10°C in winter, most of the country lies close to the coast with milder temperatures.

The average New Zealand temperature decreases as you travel south.  With their summer over January and February, these are the warmest months, and July is the coldest month of the year. In summer, the average maximum temperature ranges between 20-30ºC (70-90°F) and in winter between 10-15ºC (50-60°F).
Most places in New Zealand receive over 2,000 hours of sunshine a year, with the sunniest areas – Bay of Plenty, Hawke’s Bay and Nelson/Marlborough – receiving over 2,350 hours. As New Zealand observes daylight saving, during summer months daylight can last up until 9.30pm.

Cost of Living as a GP in New Zealand

Cost of living in New Zealand will very much depend on which part of the country you relocate.
One independent international survey ranked Auckland 58th in the world in terms of its cost of living, and Wellington 75th, far better than other major cities. Such cities included Hong Kong (3), Singapore (4), New York (16), London (25), Sydney (26), Melbourne (33) and Guangzhou (31) – showing that comparatively, New Zealand’s major metropolitan areas are more affordable. See our recent blog piece on cost of living for a GP in New Zealand

For an up to date costs of different items please see here 

New Zealand GP Registration Process

The registration process for New Zealand is relatively straightforward and usually takes a month to complete the application with the Medical Council of New Zealand.  To complete the full immigration and registration process you should allow 3 months after we have secured you a position. You will be eligible for registration if you hold a specialist GP certificate (i.e. MRCGP / MICGP / JCPTGP / PMETB).

If you hold your GP qualification from another country then you may be eligible for ‘comparable healthcare.’ registration.  You will be required to hold 3 years of comparable healthcare experience. Please see the MCNZ website for a full list of comparable countries.

All new registrants, regardless of seniority, must work under supervision for the first 6-12 months in New Zealand to become familiar with the culture.  During this time you will be registered within a provisional general scope of practice and performance will be assessed by senior colleagues.

They will be required to complete certain requirements to be registered within a general scope. This will cause minimal impact on your day to day job and you will still be able to see patients independently.

NZ Visa for GPs 

To assist you through the complex immigration process we work with a Licensed Immigration Advisor who is registered with the Immigration Advisers Authority New Zealand. Our Immigration Advisor, Nicola, will expertly assist you and manage your visa process for you and your family.

What does a GP earn in New Zealand?

The minimum hours you are required to work to comply with your visa are 30. Most GPs work 8 sessions per week (32 hours).

Unlike Australia, there are no restrictions on where you can practice as a GP in New Zealand allowing you the option to choose where to live and work; be it in the city centre, by the beach or somewhere more rural.

As a GP moving to New Zealand you will be offered an employed, salary position ($180 – $200k NZD for a full time position). You may perhaps have the option to buy into the practice or take over the practice at a later date.  Work / life balance is excellent in New Zealand, most GPs only see 4 patients per hour allowing more time with patients and less bureaucracy and paperwork.

NZ Tax Rate 

2021 – 2022 Tax Rates

10.5%              $0 to $14,000

17.5%              $14,001 to $48,000

30%                 $48,001 to $70,000

33%                 $70,001 to $180,000

39%                 $180,000 and above

For more detailed up to date tax information please see the tax office website
Income tax calculator

New Zealand Schools and Education

There’s a choice of three types of school in New Zealand – state schools (funded by the government), ‘state integrated’ schools and private schools.

State schools are the choice for the vast majority of New Zealand children (85%). Schooling is free at these schools, although parents are asked for a contribution to help cover costs of activities that are outside of the core curriculum. Typically this will be around NZ$250- $500. There will also be other charges for sports, school trips, special tuition, exam fees, and other course related costs.

‘State integrated’ schools are schools with a special character – they may be run by a particular religious faith e.g. Catholic or use specialist education methods like Steiner or Montessori. Just over 10% of students are enrolled at these schools. Education in state integrated schools is also funded by the government but the schools may charge fees for various facilities which are usually around NZ$1,500 a year.

Just under 5% of children go to private schools which charge around NZ$20,000 in fees a year.
School usually starts at 9am and runs to 3pm or 3:30pm. There are four school terms running from late January to mid-December with two-week breaks between them and a six-week summer break at the end of the year.

New Zealand Accommodation

Most GPs choose to rent a property in New Zealand first and buy later when settled. Housing varies greatly across the country.  Prices tend to be higher in the cities with Auckland being the most expensive and slightly lower on the south island.  For more information on property please see Realestate.co.nz and TradeMe

New Zealand Healthcare System

Primary healthcare, including general practice, out-patient services, and prescriptions, is funded by a combination of public subsidy and private contributions. General Practitioners provide primary, community based, comprehensive and continuing patient-centred care to individuals, families and the community. Many general practices run as private businesses and set their own fees which are paid by the patient.

The cost of a visit will be lower if you’re enrolled with the GP, because the government subsidises the fee. Some general practices join a ‘low cost access’ programme run by their primary health organisation (PHO) which is overseen by the local District Health Board. This means they get extra government funding to keep their fees at low levels.  GPs, Practice Nurses, Māori health providers and other primary healthcare providers work together to meet the health requirements of the local people, with PHOs funded according to the demographics and needs of their population.

Secondary healthcare services, including acute hospital treatment, are free to those who meet the eligibility criteria. New Zealand has a reciprocal agreement with the UK to provide free treatment. There is strong uptake of private health insurance (as in Australia), partially triggered by long waits for state hospital treatment.

Speak to Our GP Recruitment Team

Thinking about relocating to New Zealand? Our experienced GP team are here to help. We can advise on everything from visa queries to questions about the cost of living in New Zealand. Speak to us today to get started on your move down under or browse some of our excellent GP jobs New Zealand.

Further Reading
8 Benefits of Moving to New Zealand
Is there an age limit for GPs
The Cost of Living as a Doctor in New Zealand

Useful Links
Medical Council of New Zealand
Immigration New Zealand 

Education

UK Healthcare System compared to the Australia / New Zealand Healthcare system

For GPs relocating from the UK to Australia or New Zealand, you will have questions on the differences between the two health care systems. We have outlined how the health care system works in Australia and New Zealand.

Australia GP Healthcare System

Medicare is Australia’s universal health care and insurance programme. It guarantees Australian citizens access to a wide range of GP and hospital services at no or low cost.

Australia’s Medicare system is funded by the local taxpayers. Medicare is open to Australia citizens and permanent residents and those from a Reciprocal country. Once you enrol in Medicare you are issued with a Medicare card which allows you to access medical services, hospital treatment and prescription medicines.

The Medical Benefits Schedule (MBS) lists the medical services covered by Medicare either in full or partially covered. The Pharmaceutical Benefits System (PBS) reduces the cost of medication to patients. As Medicare doesn’t cover all Medicare services, many patients choose to take out private healthcare insurance.

Private vs Bulk GP Billing

Patients in a GP practice are either bulk or privately billed. Bulk billing is where the total fee is charged to Medicare with no cost to the patient. A bulk billing GP consultation will be billed with an item number which will correspond to the scheduled fee. This is what you as a GP can claim for the consultation. Private billing is where the patient is charged but the partial fee can be claimed from Medicare with a ‘gap fee’ paid by the patient. Private billing consultations are set by the practice or the individual doctor.

This will affect how you are paid working as. GP in Australia.  You will receive a percentage of billings (between 60 – 70%) Your income will be very good however dependant on the number of patients you see and the complexity of those patients.

New Zealand Health System

The Public Health system in New Zealand is funded by taxpayers. Essential health care is free for all NZ residents and those with a visa for 2 years and longer. As a UK GP there is a reciprocal agreement between the two countries to access some healthcare services.

There are 3 key sectors in New Zealand; District Health Boards, Primary Health care and Health organisations. DHBs are government funded and are responsible generally for secondary health, PHOs assist with primary health services including general practice and community health services. There is also Accident and Compensation Corporation (ACC) which is a government run personal injury scheme which helps to pay for medical and treatment fees which are caused by an accident.

General Practice in New Zealand

General practice in New Zealand are privately run and set their own fees for consultations. The fees must remain within a threshold agreed by the DHBs and PHOs and the level of co-payment is determined by the practice. The cost of the visit will be lower if you’re enrolled as the NZ government subsidises the fee for enrolled patients. Some practices join a Very Low Cost Access (VLCA) programme run by the local PHO. This means they can keep their fees low due to extra funding.

Working as a GP in New Zealand

As a GP working in New Zealand you will initially be on an employment contract paid a salaried rate. This will come with additional benefits such as paid leave, sick leave and sometimes relocation assistance and paid medical practising fees and insurance. We find that our GPs settle in well into life in New Zealand, and enjoy that enviable work / life balance in an enjoyable patient setting.

For more information on living and working as a GP in Australia or New Zealand please do get in touch. 

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New Zealand Hotel Quarantine (MIQ) coming to an end in New Zealand

New Zealand Hotel Quarantine (MIQ) ending for GPs

If you are a GP considering working in New Zealand but put off by the hotel quarantine then this will be good news…

The Minister for the Covid-19 response has announced a 3 step process which starts in Mid January to allow Residents, work visa holders and travellers to enter New Zealand without having to stay in MIQ (Managed isolation or hotel Quarantine) This is a long awaited move to enable families to be reunited.

Those eligible will still need to prove a negative pre-departure test, proof of full vaccination and declaration of travel history.

The MIQ Timeline is as follows:

  • Fully vaccinated Kiwis and other eligible travellers can travel to NZ from Australia without staying in MIQ from 11.59pm Sunday, 16 January 2022
  • Fully vaccinated Kiwis and other eligible travellers can travel to NZ from all other countries from 11.59pm Sunday, 13 February 2022
  • All fully vaccinated individuals will be able to travel to NZ from 30 April 2022 onwards, with the re-opening staged over time

What this means for GPs relocating to New Zealand

GPs are currently eligible for a Critical purpose visa to allow travel and work in New Zealand. As of the 13thFebruary 2022, this will be made much easier as you will be able to self-isolate as home rather than in expensive hotel quarantine.

Details on how self-isolation will work will be shared this month. GPs who already hold MIQ vouchers will also be provided with more information shortly. Self-isolation will require a day 1 test upon arrival in New Zealand, isolating for 7 days then a final negative test before entering the community.

What is the process for UK trained GPs moving to New Zealand

There is a shortage of GPs in New Zealand and we have many GP practices who are looking to the UK to fill their GP jobs. There are no restrictions on where you can work as a GP so you’re free to work in any location. Typically, the jobs we have are around Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and along the coastlines of the North and South Island. Contracts are from 12 months with great salaries, relocation assistance with medical registration fees and professional indemnity insurance paid.

The New Zealand medical registration process is fairly straightforward. We recommend getting in touch with the Transition Medical team about 6 months before you want to be working in New Zealand. This will give us time to find you the right GP job and the right location for you and your family. We look forward to hearing from you, please get in touch today.

Further Reading – GP Blog

Find Out more About GP Life in NZ

What do GPs earn in NZ

Top Tips for GPs relocating to NZ

What is life like working as a GP in NZ today? We catch up with a UK GP couple who moved to Wellington earlier this year

We’re really delighted to hear how a GP couple we helped relocate to New Zealand are getting on. Dan and Hannah first got in touch with us in August 2020. Emma spent time getting to know them before securing them a post just outside Wellington which they started in June this year.

They’ve kindly taken the time to outline what life is like for them as GPs in New Zealand which we hope you find helpful in your decision making. If you want to find out more about moving to New Zealand as a GP please do get in touch with Emma here

What made you decide to move to New Zealand?

We had always considered working abroad as we love travelling and had wanted to explore on a more permanent basis. We both chose general practice as a career as we felt it would allow us to travel and work abroad more quickly than some other specialist training programs, as well as the fact that it is a varied and flexible job. We had visited New Zealand and absolutely loved the people, the lifestyle and the landscape.

Tell us about a typical day in your GP role?

COVID taking off in New Zealand has slightly changed the structure of our workday (from when we started) but it is still mostly face to face appointments of minimum 15mins. Patients are encouraged to book double appointments if they have complex problems. For the most part there is allocated time for paperwork and we always have a lunch break – this even includes leaving the building for a brief walk.

We do have a reasonable input to the inner workings of the practice and have regular clinician meetings to discuss cases or whether we feel anything could be done differently.

Best Bit about your day?

Dan – Having a lunch break and finishing on time most days

Hannah – finishing on time is an absolute luxury. Also having recognised time to fill out paperwork and do scripts.

Most challenging part of your day?

Dan – Still coming to terms with certain ways the health system in New Zealand works.

Hannah – there are some differences compared to the UK in that we manage more maternity care and GUM here. It has definitely pushed me into doing some new things which we didn’t have much exposure to back home.

How do you find the culture and lifestyle compared to the UK?

Dan – We loved our lives in the UK but work was heavy in terms of volume and it was sometimes difficult to switch off. Here I find I can spend my time off not worrying about work (as it’s more manageable) which means it’s much more quality time. We moved to an area where there is plenty to do outside, we are next to forest and hills, 25mins drive to the beach and Wellington. Everyone when we moved was willing to help out and people are friendly to each other.

Hannah – New Zealand has a very relaxed lifestyle and attitude to life. Places are generally much quieter with less queues and traffic which is a welcomed change. The Wellington surroundings are beautiful and the area is so accessible to the rest of New Zealand, allowing us to reach forest, beach, mountains and city in a short drive. There is so much to do here which does make down time so much more interesting.

 

How have you and your family settled in and would you have any tips for other GPs relocating?

It helps that we are both doing the same job so the transition has been straightforward for both work and general life. There are a few things that are different in New Zealand – renting is mostly all through private landlords and there is a lot of competition for property. Housing is variable based on this and it can feel like it takes a while to find the right place. We stayed in an Air BnB for 1 month whilst we decided what areas were right for us.

Our shipping still hasn’t arrived and it’s nearly 6 months on from when it was picked up from our house in the UK. If you are bringing furniture/household items definitely arrange this early and think hard about what you would really like to have in those first few months.

How have you found the transition from general practice in the UK to New Zealand?

Dan – So much easier than expected. The medicine is similar to a few more things being managed in primary care than in the UK and others we are used to but now have very little involvement in. This will change depending on where you end up working as well and the local secondary services available.

Hannah – I am surprised by the ease at which we have both managed to transition. Having only been a GP for 1 year prior to coming to NZ, I did have some worries about this, however we have been lucky enough to find a very supportive practice with a diverse group of colleagues with varying skills. On the occasions where I have picked up the phone to the hospital, I have been greeted with friendly clinicians who have always offered helpful advice.

It is more common for referrals to get rejected in New Zealand as the public system does have a very stringent budget with strict criteria. This can impact a little on the way you practice at times.

Finally, how have you found Transition Medical in helping you make the move to NZ?

From our first contact with Emma we wouldn’t have explored any other companies helping with emigration. Even when it was just an idea she took the time to listen and address any concerns. There was never any pressure. If anything I think it was harder because we had so much choice and didn’t feel an affiliation to any particular part of New Zealand. Once we had narrowed this down the job interviews and applications were easily facilitated by Emma and Kirsty and our immigration advisor. There is a lot of information to get through but it was made as easy as possible by the team. We couldn’t recommend them highly enough.

Further Reading- click on the headings below in blue to read the full blog. 

Is there an age limit for GPs?

Top Tips for GP’s relocating to NZ

How are you supported into practice?

What next?

If you are interested in relocating to New Zealand and would like to find out more please get in touch with one of our specialist GP recruitment team.

What Do GPs Earn in New Zealand?

GP Salary New Zealand

If you’re thinking about working as a GP in New Zealand, then you are likely to be attracted by a beautiful country offering beaches, nature, outdoor adventures plus national parks for walking and biking.

You may also be thinking about the work – life balance which GPs in New Zealand enjoy and want to find out more about what life is like. One of the questions we’re often asked, is what the salary is for GPs in New Zealand. We will address these and answer your questions below.

The average working week in New Zealand is 32 – 40 hours per week or 8 – 10 sessions. Most of the contracts we see are 32 hours per week which allows for a day off in the week although there is generally scope to work up to 10 sessions if you wish. The pace of work is also more relaxed with standard appointment times of 15 minutes. You can work fewer hours, however on a temporary work visa, the minimum number of hours required is 30 per week.

GP salaries in New Zealand can be stated as an hourly rate or an annual salary. GP income is around $210,000 for a full time position of 40 hours per week. This would be pro-rata for less than 10 sessions. Contracts are employment agreements which also include paid annual leave and sick leave plus other benefits such as paid medical indemnity insurance, registration fees and sometimes relocation plus assistance towards your MIQ (managed isolation quarantine) costs.

How Do NZ Salaries Compare with the UK?

How your NZ income compares will depend on the type of practise in the UK. Salaried GPs may find their income slightly more or at least comparable. If however you are in a successful GP Partnership or busy doing Locum or Out of hours shifts, you may find income to be lower.

Money however, is not everything, and what attracts GPs to New Zealand is the lifestyle. It offers a relaxed pace of life, well run healthcare system where GPs are looked after where cost of living is affordable.

We have placed many doctors in New Zealand who find the people very friendly and life much more relaxed. If you would like to find out more about working in New Zealand please do get in touch with our team!

 

 

 

 

Is there an age limit for GPs?

A question we’re asked so often is ‘am I too old to work in Australia or New Zealand, or ‘what is the age limit for working as a GP in Australia or New Zealand?

The answer is, there is no age limit. We have placed GPs ranging from newly qualified doctors through to GPs who have reached retirement and fancy a spell working overseas.

Age is not a factor for the majority of our medical practices we work with. Most are looking for good all-round GPs with comparable qualifications.

Let’s address what practices are looking for:

Australia

If a practice in Australia is unable to find a suitable GP from within Australia they will first look overseas for a GP with substantially comparable experience such as the UK or Ireland.

The Australian registration process changed on the 1st September 2019. The registration pathway allows for those with comparable qualifications to submit a comparability assessment. To find out more please do get in touch.

New Zealand

New Zealand practices will look to comparable countries.  There are over 20 countries which are considered comparable. For a full list please the Medical Council website.

Age Limit for Visas

To apply for a temporary visa to work in either Australia or New Zealand, as long as you meet the other health and good standing criteria, then age is no factor.

If you are planning a permanent move then the age limit when applying for an independent permanent visa in Australia is 45, there are options after this age for you to be sponsored by the practice. In New Zealand, you need to apply before you reach 56. Our specialist immigration advisor can advise on your individual circumstances. For more information please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Top Tips for GPs Relocating to New Zealand

Here at Transition Medical we get asked many questions from GPs new to their New Zealand GP job search. As one of the leading UK GP recruitment agencies we have compiled a brief checklist of things you’ll need to have (and think about)!

1. Primary Medical Degree from a recognised university – MBBS, MB ChB, MD, MB BCh, BM etc

3. Language Skills – All overseas trained GPs are required to demonstrate their English competency. This is fairly straightforward for overseas GPs. It can be proven if English is your primary language, you completed your primary medical degree from a recognised English-speaking country (UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Ireland, South Africa or USA).

Another way of meeting this requirement is to have worked continuously as a registered medical practitioner where English was the first and primary language for a minimum of 2 years and can provide the names of two referees who can attest to your English language ability.

Otherwise you would need to sit an appropriate English language test eg IELTS or OET.

4. Medical Registration – Full, current and unconditional registration from your current authority (i.e. GMC) and unconditional registration from any previous registering authority. You will need a Certificate of Good Standing from each authority you have been registered over the last 5 years.

5. You must either hold a Primary Medical degree and have completed your internship from a Competent Authority such as the UK or Ireland or hold recent experience from a Comparable health system.

6. A Job Offer – To work as a GP in New Zealand and be able to secure medical registration and a suitable employment visa you must secure a job offer. The first step of this process is to speak to one of our medical recruitment specialists to find you a great GP job in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch or a fantastic coastal town or somewhere more rural. Whether you want city, beach or country life, we can find you what you’re looking for!

7. Timescales – The medical recruitment and visa process for New Zealand is relatively straightforward and will take approximately 3 months. We would recommend getting in touch around 6 months prior to you wishing to relocate.

8. Age doesn’t matter – GP practices are looking for good all-round GPs, so whether you are newly qualified, mid-way through your career or reaching retirement there will be a GP vacancy available for you.

9. COVID – We have to mention it. Although the New Zealand border is currently closed to most, GPs are still able to apply for an exemption to cross the border. We have had many doctors successfully relocate during this time. Managed isolation (MIQ) is required however we will help you navigate this process.

10. Finally – When considering working as a GP in New Zealand, it may seem a daunting process and you’ll be weighing up the pros and cons of relocating. Many GPs have already made the move and find the working conditions and lifestyle to be far superior than the UK. Discover what our GPs have to say and why we’re one of the Best Doctor Recruitment Agencies

If you are considering a move or just want to chat through options we have a dedicated team who will guide you through every step of the whole process. Visit our latest vacancies or contact us directly here.

COVID-19 Travel restrictions and exemptions – Australia and NZ

We hope you are all keeping safe and healthy.  The advice relating to travelling to both Australia and New Zealand has been changing, we have updated our blog to give you the most up to date information.  Our team continues to work remotely from home and continues to be here for you if you have any queries or questions, please do get in touch.

AUSTRALIA

The prime minister announced that only Australian citizens/permanent residents and New Zealand citizens usually residing in Australia can travel to Australia.  However, the Commissioner of the Australian Border Force (ABF) may consider entry under an exemption.

Exemptions as determined by the Commissioner:

  • Foreign nationals travelling at the invitation of the Australian Commonwealth Government for the purpose of assisting in the COVID-19 response or whose entry would be in the national interest
  • Critical medical services, including air ambulance and delivery of supplies, that regularly arrive into Australia from international ports
  • Persons with critical skills (for example, medical specialists, engineers, marine pilots and crews) by exception
  • Diplomats accredited to Australia and currently resident in Australia and their immediate family
  • ​Case-by-case exceptions may also be granted for humanitarian or compassionate reasons.

Exemptions must be granted prior to these travellers undertaking travel to Australia. The request for an exemption through Commissioner’s Discretion must be accompanied by:

  • Passenger details: name, DOB, visa type and number, passport number, Australian residential address, Australian telephone number)
  • Case information: why this case should be considered for Commissioner discretion/exemption
  • Supporting statement: the request should be accompanied by a statement and evidence of how the individual meets one of the grounds for an exemption or excise of the Commissioner’s discretion listed above.

You can apply for an exemption using this online form. Exemptions are assessed on a case-by-case basis and must be granted prior to undertaking travel to Australia.

Along with applying for an exemption, you will need to provide evidence that your employer requires you to start immediately for the purpose of assisting in the COVID-19 response.   We can assist with this.

Please note: You need to have your visa approved prior to applying for an exemption.

Self-Isolation requirement:

All travellers arriving in Australia will be required to undertake a mandatory 14-day quarantine at designated facilities, in their port of arrival.​ Travellers will be transported directly to designated facilities after appropriate immigration, customs and enhanced health checks. This requirement applies to anyone, including Australian citizens/permanent residents and temporary residents exempt from the travel ban.

It has yet to be determined how long the travel restrictions will last, we will keep up to date with developments and advise on any changes as soon as we have them.

As the above is all subject to change, we recommend referring to the Australian Department of Home Affairs website for the most up to date information.

NEW ZEALAND

The New Zealand border is currently closed to most travellers. New Zealand citizens and permanent resident visa holders can travel to New Zealand.   Immigration New Zealand will consider exemptions to travel.

Consideration will only be made for people with exceptional circumstances who have a critical purpose for travelling to New Zealand.

You must have a critical purpose for travelling to New Zealand, and:

  • meet health and character requirements for temporary entry
  • be a bona fide applicant
  • meet the funds or sponsorship requirements for visitors
  • meet onward travel requirements.

You can use this link provides further information on the above criteria.  You can use the filters to display country specific tips, to assist you with your application

Critical purposes for travelling to New Zealand

Essential health workers

A health care worker is a current or new employee where the employee holds a key clinical or non-clinical position working as a Medical Doctor in

  • a District Health Board
  • New Zealand Blood Service
  • hospice or palliative care
  • a primary care practice such as urgent care or a medical or healthcare centre
  • aged residential care, respite or continuing care facility.

Consideration will be given as to whether the person holds the necessary qualifications and registration (if required) to work in New Zealand.

Partners and dependent children of essential health workers who will accompany them may also be included in the request.

You can apply for an exemption here. You can make a request if you already have a New Zealand visa, if you have submitted an application for a visa, or if you do not have a visa.

Once your application has been submitted, an immigration officer will assess your request and if they are satisfied that you are eligible to travel to New Zealand they will contact you with information about what to do.  As they are dealing with high numbers of requests for assistance they are currently aiming to respond within two working days, however, this timeframe may be longer depending on enquiry volumes and the complexity of requests received.

Before submitting a request, please consider the availability of flights to New Zealand and travel restrictions for any country you may need to transit on the way to New Zealand.

Self-Isolation requirement:

If you arrived in New Zealand from any country in the last 14 days, you should self-isolate for 14 days from the date you departed the last country you visited.

For further up-to-date information – please see here

We appreciate this is a difficult time with everything being so uncertain.  Our team is here to help, so please do contact us if you have any specific questions or queries.  We are in this together!

 

COVID-19: A Message from Transition Medical

I think we can all agree that it has been a surprising and ever-changing week. We can only imagine that it is a stressful and challenging time for those on the frontline NHS. You would be forgiven for not placing your overseas move as your number one concern at a moment like this. We hope that you, your families and loved ones are well and that disruptions to your personal life have been kept to a minimum.

As you may be aware the authorities in Australia and New Zealand have implemented a travel ban placed on all non-residents and non-Australian citizens coming to Australia, effective from 9 pm on Friday.

We do however understand that these life-changing events may allow you to pause and reflect on what you want to be doing in your career. We will continue to offer our full recruitment service and support as we always have done and are happy to answer any questions you may have regarding the current situation.

As many companies are currently, our small team at Transition Medical are working remotely. We have operated remote teams since being established meaning that our operations are somewhat resilient to the unprecedented impact of the coronavirus. You will notice no difference from the service you receive from us.

We continue to work with outstanding practices in stunning locations across both Australia and New Zealand, within fantastic locations. The medical registration and visa process to allow you to work in Australia continues to take up to 9 months, New Zealand approx 3 months to complete by which point the pandemic will have hopefully passed.

We look forward to continuing to support you.

Hear what other GPs have to say about our GP relocation service

We have recently received some wonderful feedback from a Dutch GP we’ve helped secure their new role in New Zealand. Dr Lex is currently working as a GP on NZ’s north island and has sent in a few words and a great photo. When we asked for feedback and if and how we could improve our service he responded with this…

‘Walk me through the airport and carry my bags 🙂 – no you guys were the best, I could not think of anything. You responded always, were always available when I called and came up with great ideas with me asking such as applying for a work to residence visa. Thanks Emma, Kirsty and the whole team!

We wish Lex and his family all their best for their new life down under. It was a pleasure to help them find a great new role and life in New Zealand.

If you would like to find out more about what life is like in New Zealand as a GP please do get in touch